How To Write A Report?

What is Report Writing?

Report writing is the process of communicating information in a structured format. Reports are often used to provide a summary of events, findings, or analysis.

Types of Report Writing:

There are many different types of reports, but all share some common features. The common types of reports writing are:

  1. Short written reports
  2. Longer written reports.

What is the difference between a short and long report?

A short report refers to a report of less than 2,000 words whereas a longer one will refer to something greater than 3,000 words in length. For example: you would write a ‘short’ essay for an exam or assessment task where as you would write ‘longer’ when it comes to coursework or dissertation work. Longer projects demand more time, research and word count in order to meet the criteria set by any given assignment brief. So if your tutor sets out requirements stating that your project must be 2000-2500 words in length then you can be sure they are referring to a longer report.

How long should a report be?

Again, this will depend on the type of writing you are doing and its purpose. Professional reports tend towards longer pieces of work, often 3-5 pages in length, whereas academic essays or coursework projects will normally be 1000 words in length.

What is the difference between an essay and a report?

Essays tend to focus more closely on analysis whereas reports are usually used when you need to communicate information to someone else in an easily readable format for reference purposes. You can also use your essay to help inform your research – it’s important to read other people’s studies in order to inform your own original work… so if you’re using an essay as part of your research process then it is effectively acting as a report.

How to Write a Report:

The following steps will help you to produce a high-quality report:

1. Decide on the purpose of the report:

What is your main objective?

2. Gather information and data:

This can be done through interviews, surveys, questionnaires, or other research methods.

3. Structure the information:

Create an outline or diagram that will help you to organize the data in a logical way.

4. Write the report:

Begin with an introduction that states the purpose of the report, followed by the body which presents the information in a clear and concise manner. Finish with a conclusion that summarizes the findings of the report.

5. Edit and proofread the report:

Check for grammar mistakes, typos, and clarity.

Useful Tips for Report Writing:

1. Make sure that your writing is clear and concise.

2. Use headings and sub-headings to organize the information in a logical way.

3. Start with the most important points and build up to the conclusion.

4. Use active rather than passive verbs whenever possible.

5. Check for grammar mistakes and typos before submitting your report.

6. If you are not sure about something, ask a friend or colleague for help.

7. Always read the assignment brief carefully to make sure that you understand what is required of you.

A report should be clear and concise, and it should use an objective tone. It should also be well-organized, with sections that are easy to understand.

Reports are typically written for a specific audience. Therefore, it is important to consider your readers when creating your document. You should always tailor your content to meet the needs of your audience.

Writing Styles in Report Writing:

Specific writing styles are often required for different types of reports. For example, medical or scientific reports may require research data.

Business or technical reports often include charts and tables to help illustrate important concepts.

Most types of reports should include the following sections:

Introduction – gives an overview of the topic

Methodology – describes how information was gathered

Findings – lists key points that were discovered during research

Conclusions/Recommendations – discusses what can be done next, based on findings from the report

Appendixes – contains additional supporting information that is too lengthy for inclusion in the main body of the report Give yourself enough time to write your report. Rushing through the process will likely result in a document that is sloppy and difficult to read.

If you are having difficulty writing your report, there are many resources available to help you. There are books and websites devoted specifically to report writing, and many colleges and universities offer courses on the subject. You can also find helpful tips from professional writers online or in print magazines. In addition, most word processing programs include templates for different types of reports, which can be a great starting point for your own documents. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask for help from a friend or colleague – they may be able to offer some useful insights into the process.

Report writing examples

Now that you understand the basics of report writing, it’s time to see how it’s done in practice. Below are two examples of reports, one scientific and one business-related.

Example 1: A Scientific Report

The following report was written by a team of researchers who studied the effects of a new drug on mice.

Introduction

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a new drug on mice. We hypothesized that the drug would cause an increase in body weight.

Methodology

We used a group of 60 male mice for our study. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: 20 mice received the drug, 20 mice received a placebo, and 20 mice served as the control group. day, we measured the weight of each mouse. We performed our measurements 3 times per week for 10 weeks.

Results

Our findings indicate that, after 10 weeks of treatment, the mice who received the drug had an average body weight 5.5 grams heavier than those in the control group. In addition, 45% of the mice from the drug group gained 9 grams or more during this time period compared to just 20% of those in the control group. These results confirm our hypothesis that this new drug increases body weight when administered to male lab mice over a 10-week period

Conclusions

The results from this study have several implications for future research. Further testing should be done to determine whether these effects extend beyond a 10-week period as well as whether there is a difference between the effects of this drug on male mice compared to female mice.

Example 2: A Business Report

The following report was written by a human resources manager at an insurance company. It provides information about the state of health benefits for employees and suggests possible changes that should be considered in upcoming negotiations with the company’s unions.

Introduction

As part of our ongoing commitment to providing our employees with quality health care, we evaluated what has changed since last year’s contract negotiations with regard to health care plans and their costs. This report presents our findings and proposes two possible courses of action for future negotiations.

Findings/Recommendations

Here are some key points that were uncovered during our research (see attached charts). First, premium contributions for our high-deductible health plan more than doubled since last year. Based on what we’ve seen with this increase, it seems likely that the plan’s deductible will also continue to rise in upcoming contract negotiations. As a result, we recommend including provisions related to these trends in any new agreement reached with the unions. Second, while out-of-pocket maximums have stayed roughly the same, overall cost sharing has increased by almost 5 percent. Because of this change, employees are now contributing significantly more of their own money toward their healthcare costs (almost 16 percent). We recommend that unions be encouraged to find ways to reduce these expenses for members during future contract negotiations.

Conclusion

In light of what was uncovered through this study, we believe it’s important for our company to move forward with these two proposals during upcoming contract negotiations. We also recommend that this information be shared with members of both unions via their respective newsletter and/or website.

Report writing examples focused on scientific reports:

The following report was written by a team of researchers who studied the effects of a new drug on mice.

Introduction

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a new drug on mice. We hypothesized that the drug would cause an increase in body weight.

Methodology

We used a group of 60 male mice for our study. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: 20 mice received the drug, 20 mice received a placebo, and 20 mice served as the control group. The mice received their respective treatments for 10 weeks, during which time we measured each mouse’s body weight three times per week.

Results

Our findings indicate that, after 10 weeks of treatment, the mice who received the drug had an average body weight 5.5 grams heavier than those in the control group. In addition, 45% of the mice from the drug group gained 9 grams or more during this time period compared to just 20% of those in the control group. These results confirm our hypothesis that this new drug increases body weight when administered to male lab mice over a 10-week period.

Conclusion

The results from this study have several implications for future research; further testing should be conducted to determine the long-term effects of this drug and to determine whether these results apply to female mice as well. Additionally, this drug should be further evaluated for its potential as a weight-loss treatment.

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