Introduction OF Instruction Templates( Direct or Indirect)

 

What is a Template?

These are sheets of paper or other material that outline shapes or lines in a way that students will be able to copy onto another sheet of paper.

Characteristics of Template

-Templates should be used for one task only

Using the same template over and over can become monotonous for students, which can make it less effective.

The template should be Customized While Used for more than one Student:

-When using templates with more than one student, they should need to be customized so that they are unique to each individual. For example, a word problem template could have a list of problems generated randomly from a bank of available problems so that each child receives different practices in solving them.

It Maybe Modified

-Modifying a template is easy if you use a computer program such as PowerPoint or Google Slides. Templates can even be made from images from online search engines such as Google Images or Microsoft Office Online Clip Art. These programs may also have preformatted images that can be made into templates.

If you prefer to make your Template By Hand

-However, if you prefer to make your template by hand, carefully draw the lines and shapes with a ruler or straight edge. Remember that it is important not to stick strictly to geometric shapes (e.g., use diamonds for quadrilaterals). Draw each line smoothly without making many sharp angles or jagged edges. Also, choose different colors rather than using just one color or black and white whenever possible for readability. Lastly, avoid using excess fine lines as these may become confusing during the construction process.

-Remember that every line you draw will need to be traced at least once. Therefore, make sure the template is large enough for students to easily trace without needing to hold it up (if it must be held up, make sure there are no holes where the sheet can tear). Also, keep in mind that teacher assistance may be required depending on how complex the shape is and the extent of its detail. The more detailed a template becomes, the more difficult it can become for young children to follow (i.e., if lines cross each other).

Decorating Templates

-Decorating templates with words or numbers can easily be done through handwriting these directly onto them by hand or using pre-made letters or shapes printed onto sticker paper which can then be attached to the template. If you plan on doing this, make sure that the font size and style is consistent for all words or numbers.

-Whenever possible, try to create a template that is unique and different from any other ones that may be in use. This can be done by varying the shapes, orientations, or sizes of geometric shapes used in the template. Additionally, adding curves or diagonals can also make a template more interesting to look at and easier to follow for students.

Templates for Indirect Instructions

There are many different methods that can be used for indirect instruction. One popular way to deliver this type of instruction is through the use of templates. These are sheets of paper or other material that outline shapes or lines in a way that students will be able to copy onto another sheet of paper. This can be used so that students can use the paper as a guide when drawing with pen and pencil (handwriting practice) or when cutting out shapes using scissors. Templates can be used both in traditional classroom settings and for homeschooling purposes.

Guidelines for making a Template

When designing a template, there are certain guidelines that should be taken into consideration so that children will have an easier time understanding how to follow it. These include:

  1. Making sure lines do not cross over each other,
  2. Ensuring words or numbers written onto the template are legible from a distance, Avoiding templates with unnecessary fine details,
  3. Creating unique templates whenever possible instead of using the same one all the time, etc.

It is important to remember that even though creating templates is easy to do, teachers must still take precautions

The following is an example template for indirect instruction/handwriting practice:

 

Examples for Indirect Instruction/Writing Practice

-Modifying a template

It is easy if you use a computer program such as PowerPoint or Google Slides. Templates can even be made from images from online search engines such as Google Images or Microsoft Office Online Clip Art. These programs may also have preformatted images that can be made into templates. However, if you prefer to make your template by hand, carefully draw the lines and shapes with a ruler or straight edge. Remember that it is very important to use thick lines for handwriting practice.

Formation of a Template

-A template can be made using a variety of different materials.

It is best to choose the type of material that will work best with your class. For example, if you are working on cutting skills, it may be better to use paper or cardstock as these will be easier for students to cut through without damaging other parts of the item being cut out. If you are looking for material that is easy for children with fine motor difficulties to hold onto and move around, items such as foam sheets or play dough can also work well.

-If possible, keep your plan simple

So young children will not become overwhelmed by too many shapes or lines on the page. When using indirect instruction, the task is to copy certain shapes and lines onto another sheet of paper. Depending on the age and developmental level of your students, you may want to use only one or two different sheets of material at a time. For example, if you are using playdough for indirect instruction, it may be best to only use 2-3 colors at a time for this activity.

Template for Children learning Alphabets

-Several items can be used as templates when working with children learning letters of the alphabet. Some common examples would include pages from books (such as letters cut out from magazines), letter tiles, craft sticks, pieces of cardboard, pieces of PVC pipe, alphabet coins, or foam letters. You can also make your own template by drawing or printing letters onto cardstock or poster board.

-It is important to select the right type of material when making a template for indirect instruction.

Different materials offer different types of challenges and can be better or worse suited for certain tasks. For example, if you are working on cutting skills, it may be better to use paper or cardstock as these will be easier for students to cut through without damaging other parts of the item being cut out. If you are looking for material that is easy for children with fine motor difficulties to hold onto and move around, items such as foam sheets or play dough can also work well.

-Remember to keep your templates simple!

This will help students focus on the task at hand and not get overwhelmed by too many shapes or lines on the page. If you are working with young children it may be best to use a single template at a time, using the same material so students can get used to what is expected of them.

-If your class is working on letter learning and recognition,

There are many different types of items that can be used as templates for indirect instruction. Some examples include pages from books (such as letters cut out from magazines), letter tiles, craft sticks, pieces of cardboard, pieces of PVC pipe, alphabet coins, or foam letters. You can also make your own template by drawing or printing letters onto cardstock or poster board.

There are many different types of templates that can be used in the classroom. Some of the most common include:

-Task templates:

These help students with specific tasks, such as writing a report or completing a math problem.

-Step-by-step templates:

These help students understand and complete a process, such as baking a cake or assembling a toy.

-Sequence templates:

These help students understand the order of events, such as in a story or scientific experiment.

 

-Scaffolder templates:

These provide extra support to students when they are first learning new material. As they become more proficient, the scaffolding is removed so that they can complete the task independently.

 

When using templates in the classroom, it is important to be sure that they are tailored to the individual student’s needs and abilities.

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